Kerrin Bradfield is an Accredited Clinical Sexuality Educator with the  Society of Australian Sexologists Ltd. She adheres to the Society’s  Code of Ethics and Practice.

To find out more, go to www.societyaustraliansexologists.org.au

info@goldcoastsexology.com.au

 

Tel: 0407 449 852

I acknowledge and pay respects to the Yugambeh, Koombumerrii and Bundjalung people, past, present and future, of the Gold Coast. I recognise the sovereignty of First Nations people and the resilience shown in fighting for lands, laws, and people. Always was, always will be Aboriginal land. 

© 2020 Gold Coast Sexology

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NDIS, sexuality, and sexual rights

In July 2019, the National Disability Insurance Scheme lost an appeal to stop a woman from using her funding for sexuality services. There is still some confusion over the exact finding as the original application was for a sex worker and the outcome was for a specialised sex therapist, however there are some important issues that arise.


Research shows that people with disability experience sexual violence at a significantly higher rate than the general population and along with protection, their right to pleasurable, consensual, and safe experiences is important. As a Clinical Sexologist I support an improved NDIS system that recognises and responds to the needs of people with disability to allow them to enjoy the benefits of society the same as everyone else - this includes expressing their sexuality.


The World Health Organisation (2006) defines sexuality as"…a central aspect of being human throughout life encompasses sex gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviours, practices, roles and relationships. While sexuality can include all of these dimensions, not all of them are always experienced or expressed. Sexuality is influenced by the interaction of biological, psychological, social, economic, political, cultural, legal, historical, religious and spiritual factors.” (WHO, 2006a)

(image: Amaze.org)


GCSx advocates for recognition and acceptance of sexual rights (you can read the World Association of Sexual Health’s Declaration of Sexual Rights at www.worldsexology.org) for all people including people with disability and people who chose sex work as their form of labour. These rights underpin human rights and the overall health and wellbeing of the individual, with a large body of evidence supporting these links.


(image: World Association of Sexual Health)


Individuals have a range of needs of both daily living, self-care, and independence. However a person’s sexuality is a central component of self which cannot be ignored or prioritised by anyone other than the individual themselves. Sexuality is both social and deeply personal.


My work as both a sexuality educator and advocate will always support the right of the individual to self-determine (so long as it doesn't harm others), to fully realise their capabilities as a human, and to thrive in a society that sees them as whole and valuable. I also actively work in communities to prevent violence, to remove the shame associated with sexuality, to decolonise sexual health and education, and to ensure that agency and consent are at the core of sexual understanding. Working with organisations and practitioners is an important part of spreading these messages.


Want to know more?


Download the free resources and head on over to my Facebook page to join a community of like-minded people passionate about sexuality and sexual rights.